11-Year-Old Girl Suffers Fatal Allergic Reaction After Dentist Prescribes New Toothpaste

April 28, 2019
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A family in Southern California is mourning the death of their 11-year-old daughter, Denise Saldate.

Denise had a fatal allergic reaction to an ingredient in a prescribed toothpaste.

Denise went to the dentist with her mother Monique Altamirano ,earlier this month.

The dentist reportedly noticed some spots on the girl’s teeth and suggested that a prescription toothpaste known as MI Paste One would help to strengthen her tooth enamel.

Denise had a severe dairy allergy and was accustomed to reading food product labels. As a child, Denise’s parents would read children’s toothpaste labels, but had never seen milk as an ingredient.

Altamirano told Allergic Living that nobody thought to read the prescription toothpaste label.

The toothpase included a milk-derived protein known as Recaldent.

“I did not think to look at the product ingredients,” Altamirano said.

“She was just excited to have her special toothpaste,” Altamirano said

On the evening of April 4, Denise tried the new toothpaste for the first time, brushing her teeth in the bathroom alongside together with her 15-year-old sister.

The next few moments were a whirlwind as Denise’s body immediately reacted to the milk protein.

Denise ran into her mother’s bedroom, crying and unable to breathe. She said she believed she was having an allergic reaction.

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“She said, ‘I think I’m having an allergic reaction to the toothpaste,’ and her lips were already blue,” Altamirano said.

I picked her up and put her on my bed. I ran to the living room, told my daughter – ‘Call 911!’ — and I grabbed the EpiPen.”

“She was saying, ‘Mommy, I can’t breathe,’” Altamirano said. “I was saying, ‘I love you, yes, you can.’”

Altamirano administered the EpiPen and had Denise use her inhaler, however it was just not enough to stop the allergic reaction.

Altamirano, began CPR on her daughter until paramedics arrived but tragically, Denise did not make it.

Flooded with grief, Altamirano cannot help but blame herself.

“Contrary to what everyone’s telling me, I feel like I failed her!” Altamirano said.

Altamirano is hoping that her daughter’s story will serve as a cautionary reminder to families dealing with severe allergies.

“Read everything. Don’t get comfortable, just because you’ve been managing for several years,” Altamirano said.

You can’t get comfortable or be embarrassed or afraid to ask and ensure that ingredients are OK. Be that advocate for your child.

“This is your child’s life, and God forbid you have to go through what I’m going through.”

Absolutely tragic.

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